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20131210
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servers, undermining our ability to provide our users with more secrecy. what is talking about is the nsa program called muscular at the world learned about at the end of october. as we learned that as of january of this year basically the nsa was taking data from both google, yahoo! and their internal servers, millions of records and data as well as metadata. would like for one and into that program. talk to me about what we are talking about here. to data collection is not as it sounds. is. the concern >> the way it was working in the past that we all knew about, thanks to snowden, i guess, was that the u.s. government, the nsa would go to these tech companies and say we would like information about -- we would like access to e-mails and data s of yours heard there provider that end would be quite restricted about what they could disclose to the client or to the general public about what they were sharing with the government. that program was called prism. there were a lot of objections to the prism program. they got court last approval to go about this. what irked them is muscular and
confrontation with china with former cia and nsa director, general michael hayden. and our power player of the week this holiday season is not your typical turkey farmer. >> i'm really happiest when i'm engaged in working and thinking and striving. >> all, right now, on fox news sunday. >> and hello again from fox news in washington. the president promised by the end of november, the problems plaguing healthcare.gov would be fixed. and a new administration report released this morning cites, quote, "dramatic progress." but does that mean the web site to enroll in obamacare is fully functional? and what about the larger program? we'll have a fair and balanced debate between two experts in a moment. but, first, we turn to fox news correspondent peter doocy for the latest -- peter. >> chris, federal officials promised that healthcare.gov would work smoothly for a vast majority of users starting today. but that has not been the case so far because this morning, the critical verification system is unavailable. that's the system that confirms identities and make sure people are receiving pro
by anonymous as well as the release of the nsa files constitutes an act of terrorism. certainly the impacts have been dramatic. they been political in nature. but they have also certainly had impacts far beyond what to expect to find on a thumb drive. once again, that using sample of an intelligent individual, and eric an individual, and he disassociated individual. feeling free to carry out what he or she felt to be a legitimate exercise of his self-imposed authority. going back to the questions you asked. 9/11, a redo on that. for the lone wolf i would argue that a 9/11 spectacular or anything with that kind of the body count is probably beyond their reach. probably. there are some -- you could have the perfect storm. you could argue that 9/11 itself was the perfect storm. eighth circuit exceeded the expectations of al qaeda. will society survived? yes, society will survive. society will survive because where more resilient than any one individual or one small group of individuals. we are a society of 350 million within a larger society of 6 billion. yes, so -- society will survive but at
to the implementation of these major policy issues. whether it's national security and the nsa. or his health care law. it asit inattention or is some people have suggested people not wanting to tell the president bad news? himself with nd people who are willing to tell wrong?en things are going >> that's a good distinction to make. the ng to people inside white house is the fastest way to get on the president's side is not telling him what he want to hear. but that said, there was a lot shared with the president. and this goes back to this year irs turned inspector auditors report about paying attention to conservative groups. he wasn't aware of that, wasn't told that at the time even staff knew that. he increasingly surrounds himself with people he knows well. he does not have a lot of contacts in washington. time not spend a lot of here before becoming president. his small circle of close advisors are getting smaller and his time in office wears on. >> the first 45 minutes of the ashington journal this morning talking about congress. scott wilson, "the washington ost" white house bureau chief focu
we had the smiley face emoticon under the nsa slide that indicated exactly how the nsa is collecting data from google and yahoo! where their internal servers meet the public internet and how they are taking tens of millions of records every day. he is saying all of these companies -- this whole soul and gathering of metadata and records has to come to an end. >> this whole cell is not the only way the nsa collect data. >> that is where it all began with the snowden leaking the documents about the prism program. i run it is the u.s. as i write is theu.s. -- ironic u.s. have access and they can go to the companies and say, i want francine lacqua's data and get it. what the companies want is when that happened, we want to disclose to our users, more information about the fact it was requested of us. and they are quite a limited right now about what they can andand how many data report how many requests. they want an end to the whole cell taking of data -- wholes ale taking of data. >> ryan, thank you so much on the technology letter. fiat investing. more on its investment to what it mea
tracked every day. >> did you think the n.s.a. wasn't tapping your phone? tapping myey're genetic data. >> i've known ever since the and gene hackman movie that the n.s.a. was listening to everything. state."f the >> you're ok with it? >> you just know it's happening. that's what the n.s.a. is supposed to do, covert separations that we don't expect but know are happening. that's the n.s.a. take on get your first monday. here's a look at what's next on ."treet smart >> grading the jobs report. the former chairman of economic advisors, ed lazear and new jersey congressman scott garrett deliver washington's review of report.oyment >> america is getting back to work. today's job report shows u.s. unemployment is down to a impressiveow, an milestone for sure. but our next guest says we are not out of the woods yet. seven-year target on our recovery. and he might know. chairman ofmer economic advisors. we want to welcome ed lazier back to "street smart." to see you. >> good to see you. thanks for having me. >> seven years it's going to to reallyat long return to real prosperity? to realo ret
phones are being tracked based on leaks from former n.s.a. contractors, and interviews with u.s. intelligence officials. >> the report said the n.s.a. can pin down the location of a cell phone and map out relationships from them. the spy agency say it does not target the whereabouts of phones in the u.s. the n.s.a. confirmed it gathers information about americans insidently. >> a scam was discovered by trust wave. militias viruses were sent to thousands of users. it tracked credential. users of facebook, yahoo twitter could be affected. 16,000 accounts were hacked that use 123456. >> anarchy in argentina, why police refuse to put a stop no wild looting in one city. >> american doctors on the front lines of a bird flu scare half a world away. >> they've come a long way since don't ask, don't tell. coming out created new problems. >> you are looking at dallas, were there may be rain together and possibly tonight. >>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm thomas drayton. looting in argentina, why the police did not step in to stop it. >> first a look at the weathe
to the implementation of these major policy issues, whether national security in the case of the nsa, or whether it is his health care law, which is legacy. is it people not wanting to tell the president bad news? is he not willing to surround tell himith people who that things are wrong? there was a lot of bad news not shared with the president. this goes back to this year, the irs inspector general's report about paying particular attention to conservative groups. that, not aware of told of that, even though senior staff knew. surroundedy, he himself by people that he knew. he did not have many contacts in washington, did not spend much time here before becoming president. circle ofady close advisers became smaller and smaller as his time or on. we are talking about congress with scott wilson, the white house chief euro spokesperson for "the washington post." we are talking about the recent rollout of healthcare.gov, saidcism that has been about that. woodbridge, virginia. good morning, you are on with scott wilson. i want to address the issue that if you want to keep your insurance company, y
i will be on the show this year, the microsoft story points to the nsa issue. and i still believe that is the biggest tech story of the year. last time i was on we talked a lot about twitter. pre-ipo and now it is trading in the 40's, out of the gate raging. but the nsa story and what i think isught forth going to have far, far reaching impacts. >> we want to have you on the show once more this year. we are doing our new year's eve show midnight at the new york federal reserve. we will have you on. forex report. let's quickly get there. british sterling -- £ would better than good. i don't have it on their. 1.3589.lar, it is "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> this is "bloomberg surveillance." , the volcker 950 rule and this morning volcker rule will forever change american banking. good news for the president. a warm bodies are signing up for health care.gov. ford motor tries to strike magic again. a new mustang. we will speak today to alan mulally and mark fields. dear board wants to party like it is 1964. good morning, everyone. it is "bloomberg surveillance." i'm tom keene live
. [ applause ] >> so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello, we think ou're doing a great job. in any event, the senators are famous for speaking at great lengths. i won't do that to you today. but let me just say that i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. is senator long still here? senator -- i see pat. pat, raise your hand. senator miller and senator wong was here. i guess he had to step out. but in any event, i was elected governor at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday was in september i matured. i took office when i was 33. i did not serve in the state legislature. i had served as secretary of state. i'd been involved politically. but i had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and the house the way i would like to and i did over the next eight years. and i realized pretty quickly, john, probably the same way in utah, we have a saying in indiana that governor proposes, state legislature, isposes. so i realized we needed to try to find common ground. and i had to challenge right away in my eight yea
dialogues. host: thank you for the call. you mentioned the nsa. there was a story this morning -- the piece begins with these words -- next is gilbert from tulsa oklahoma. on the question of u.s. global power, is it the climbing or on the rise he echo caller: -- on the rise? caller: to me it is declining. there is a difference between being that between being the strongest and the most powerful. i think we are the strongest but not the most powerful. the nations we have gone to war with are more powerful than we are financially. look at japan. look at south korea, look at germany. we areere at home, losing all kinds of respect at home. we are all over the world shooting and killing people. barack obama was not savvy enough to understand what was going on in washington dc. we will go to texas, ronnie, what is your take on -- on this? on this is in: as long as obama there -- [indiscernible] normal from west palm beach florida on the democrats line. caller: people voted for change. now that we have so much chagnnge they don't like it. host: al from castle tin new york, good morning. to answer
the nsa surveillance, what's happening as far as tapping data at the source. i mean the methods that have been used to get this information, they're unhappy about it, looking for change. >> the defense, though, during the beginning of the nsa surveillance leak back in june, we started hearing the beginning of this, you could actually thwart certain attacks by connecting some people and their communications and the best defense i heard you can't find a needle in a haystack without a haystack but what can you find when looking at someone's gaming you're trying to connect a bunch of different data points you, might find something interesting. if you're able to connect this gamer who is having a conversation with that gamer, maybe what they're talking about isn't the game because these games have communications capables. a lot of time people have been using back channels like that talking about something they don't want eavesdropped upon. the broader issue for business, american companies are concerned that the world won't trust them and they're looking for growth in emerging markets. when an
. [laughter] so to our friends at the nsa, we say hello. we think you're doing a great job las. [laughter] senators are famous for speaking at great length. i want to do today but let me say i have a great deal of admiration for state legislators. i developed that in my own right when i became governor. by the way, is the sender long still? path, raise your hand. senator miller is here from a indiana and senator long was a. i guess it just about. but in any event, one of our regrets i was elected at the ripe old age of 32. my birthday is in september so i have matured by the time it took office i was 33. i regretted not served in the state legislature. i served as secretary of state and i've been involved politically but i hadn't had a chance to get to know the members of the senate and house the way that i would like to come and that it did over the next eight years. i realized pretty quickly, jon, i'll be the same when utah, we have a saying in indiana that governors propose. state legislatures disposes. so i realize we needed to try to find common ground, and i had a challenge right aw
, in their balkan task force, the cia, the defense intelligence tea, the nsa, the joint chiefs of staff, regularly working together. see nature to deputies committee that kept all the agencies working together. we were committed to sharing information, not coordinate, to try to reconcile the apparent inconsistencies and then to make good decisions. you now, i love all the shows, homeland and all that stuff. i love that stuff. but the real world involves all the cia folks out there killing themselves to figure out what is really going on and have to get that back to the policymakers. what leon says is right. you have to be attacked, not passive can an arab intelligence. otherwise everyone just assumes your bandwidth has been choked in 1994 and 1995 and you wind up like we were, not even having a meeting about one. because you are so obsessed with all this other stuff. so the obligation of the policymakers is to be aggressive in saying what we need. i also agree with the comments that were made in the piano about the need to have someone representing these intelligence forces in the room when you're
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14